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Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Bollock dagger

I have had this blade for a bollock dagger lying around for almost two years now. So I thought that it was due time to do something about it.
Therefore I spent some time during my winter holiday carving a handle for it.

I first ordered the blade when I saw this bollock dagger at the National museum in Copenhagen a couple of years ago. I really liked the octagonal handle and wondered why I hadn't really seen any reproductions of these daggers with that type of handle.
My handle is not a reproduction of the one I saw though. Just inspired by the shape of it.

Here is the one I made:



The handle is made from the root of waht I believe was a cherry tree. I'm not exactly sure, since It had been on the ground for a long time. The bark was falling of and the leaves were long gone. But I managed to get a good chunk of one of the roots sticking up from the ground.



The scabbard-design is inspired from some of the scabbards in "Knives and scabbards" and is made from two layers of leather.

9 comments:

Frej said...

Looks great, especially so compared to the overpolished stuff that you can buy from reenactment-places.
Love the fact that you have left the marks from the hammerstrokes visible on the rivet.

Mikkel Frederiksen said...

Thank you Frej! Getting posetive comments on knifes from you, is no small thing :-)

historiskdrakt said...

Yummy! Simply an exquisite piece of craftsmanship I must say. Although I’m happy with my dagger from Todd’s Stuff I’d love to own a fine one like that.

/Mikael

Mikkel Frederiksen said...

I definately wouldn't be unsatisfied with a knife from Tod either. I got an eating knife from him some years back, and it really is a great knife.
Im not rally sure that I can compete with the quality of his products.

He just updated his shop last week. Did you see it?
www.todsstuff.co.uk

Frej said...

Thank´s guys for the Tod-tip, had forgotten about him.
The knives there is actually pretty fucking awesome, well, at least some of them :)

Anonymous said...

Tod's top-end knives are done to a high standard, but his stall at TORM this year was disappointing. Even at the £100+ mark, the finish on a lot of the daggers was not as good as it used to be. Oozing epoxy was a real issue. Maybe this is only important for living history use, but all the same, at that price point, I would expect a much neater finish. A slow decline in standards can happen when makers become very successful and start producing in ever larger quantities. The sheath tooling remains excellent. Philip of Wythe.

Edvin said...

Very nice! Is the blade sharp on the convex or the concave side? I like the finish, looks "gritty" in the right way.

Mikkel Frederiksen said...

@Edvin:
It is sharp on the convex side of the blade.
And thank you for the nice comment. I an sorry I didn't see it before :-)

I just made another one a couple of weeks ago. Will post it soon :-)

jimmy jam said...

I really liked the octagonal handle and wondered why I hadn't really seen any reproductions of these daggers with that type of handle.
My handle is not a reproduction of the one I saw though. best hunting knives